Frequently Asked Questions

When does PAWPAW happen?

 

Supper at PAWPAW takes place most Saturday evenings with two seatings at 6:00pm and 8:30pm. Please refer to our reservations section for our current schedule.

How much does supper at PAWPAW cost?

 

The menu at PAWPAW is $75. It includes the entire multi-course tasting menu. That price does not include, tax or gratuity, but it will be included in the final price when you book your reservation.

Beverages are a separate charge, billed at the conclusion of your meal by Bruce and Son. Gratuity for beverages has not been pre-paid, and is greatly appreciated by your bartender. 

What type of food is served at PAWPAW?

 

The food at PAWPAW is American. The menu changes weekly, and the ingredients (including fish and proteins) are always sourced from Long Island farms and waters. Many ingredients are foraged from the nearby woods, beaches, and lakes. An offering at PAWPAW can range from the uniquely delicious (like crispy duck tongues and wine mustard) to the deceptively simple (like a roasted Long Island potato with whipped raw cow's cream and green juniper salt).

What about drinks?

 

All beverages are provided by the team at Bruce and Son. They offer a short menu with local wine and beer, and both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cocktails. BYOB is an option - the corkage fee is $20 per bottle.

Because PAWPAW and Bruce and Son are different businesses, you'll receive a check for your beverages at the conclusion of the meal from Bruce and Son. The gratuity for beverages has not been pre-paid, and is greatly appreciated by your bartender. 

How do I make a reservation?

 

All reservations are made through the Tock platform. You can make a reservation here.

What is a pawpaw?
 
Pawpaw is a species of asimina native to the midwestern United States. Large towering trees bear fruit, called pawpaws, that are yellow green in color. Pawpaws are the largest edible fruit indigenous to the United States. The flesh of the pawpaw have been described as having a sweet custardy flavor similar to a banana, mango, or cantaloupe. Pawpaw fruit begins fermenting just hours after it is picked which is why it is rarely cultivated. If you want one, you must gather it from the wild. In the autumn, Taylor would pick pawpaws with his grandad in the woods of Indiana.
Oh, and who makes all those cool plates?
 
Glad you asked! Many of our plates, bowls, and coffee service items are created by New York artist Chris Fanjul. Check out (and purchase) his seriously legit pottery stuff here.